Monday, November 3, 2014

Importance of Full Term Pregnancies

Healthy babies begin with healthy mothers....


By Amanda Reed, MD
Obstetrician/Gynecologist

Pregnancy is one of the most exciting and vulnerable times of a woman's life. Most of us have thought about pregnancy and how our pregnancy would go long before we were actually pregnant. Most of the time, everything goes just right. However, almost one in eight women deliver preterm (defined as less than 37 weeks).
                                                           
If a woman believes she is in preterm labor, she should call her doctor immediately and be evaluated.

Why do women give birth early?
Half of preterm deliveries are because of preterm labor, while the other half has a medical indication for early delivery such as preeclampsia or their bag of water may have broken early.

Who is at increased risk?
There are some risk factors for preterm delivery. They include women with a history of preterm delivery, short cervical length noted on ultrasound, a history of cervical surgeries such as a D&C, and smoking (another reason to quit ladies). If a woman is found to have a short cervical length, there are medical management options. Women with a history of preterm delivery are treated with medications in later pregnancies.

The providers of Women’s Care believe having a healthy pregnancy starts before a woman is pregnant. Healthy babies begin with healthy mothers. We promote a well-balanced lifestyle to our patients, which means preconception care, proper nutrition, routine exercise, a healthy, safe environment, as well as a daily prenatal vitamin with folic acid. With good guidance, avoidable conditions that may have everlasting consequences may be prevented. We would love the privilege to take care of you and answer any questions you might have about pregnancy care or preterm deliveries.

About Women’s Care of Wisconsin The providers at Women’s Care of Wisconsin are devoted to you and your health. That means having the most advanced techniques, up-to-date educational information and a compassionate, caring staff. Our providers offer a well-rounded approach to your OB/GYN care, one that meets both your physical and emotional needs throughout every phase of your life. We call it our Circle of Care. From adolescence through menopause and beyond, you can depend on us. Meet our providers and learn more about gynecology, pregnancy care, midwifery, infertility, procedures and surgery, incontinence, osteoporosis, menopause and more at www.womenscareofwi.com or call 920.729.7105 for any questions or concerns. 

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

September is Pain Awareness Month


Life can be full of “Why me’s?”


By: Michelle Landsverk
Phsyical Therapist


Why do I ache? Why can’t I sleep? Why am I depressed? Why don’t I have any money? Why doesn’t anybody understand me?  Why won’t my health care provider listen to me? Why do I hurt so much?

Unfortunately, this is a question I hear nearly every day. The answer to this question is chronic pain, and it tends to tamper with your quality of life.

At the present time, there is no known cure for chronic pain. No test to diagnose it. No pill to cure it. No procedure to fix it. No surgery to remove it.

This blog is merely a commentary on chronic pain and for a better understanding of your particular situation; you may need to have several conversations with several healthcare providers.

The negative consequences of chronic pain are certainly astounding, to say the least. HOWEVER—patient advocacy groups and patients themselves have demanded better care. Better care starts with a better understanding of the problem. And a better understanding begins with research. Chronic pain often co-exists with other conditions. That is to say, that fibromyalgia, painful bladder syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, chronic pelvic pain, TMJ pain, irritable bowel syndrome, dysautonomia, depression and anxiety: many of these problems go together! Although this is not good news, it is an important finding, especially if the health care team is going to manage patients effectively. First, let’s take a look at what we know about pain and pain management.

How did it start?

Both biology and environment are usually in the background of the diagnosis of chronic pain.

One common factor in regards to all chronic pain syndromes is that the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) is altered in the way it processes pain. So, the way that chronic pain is felt, is much different than the way acute, or new pain, is felt. Acute pain is usually very intense, localized to a certain area, and definable.   For example, a stabbing, sharp pain in a certain spot tends to stay that way until it’s gone.   It’s also typically accompanied by swelling, redness, or heat; there is evidence of actual damage to the body. Chronic pain is much different; there is no new tissue damage and no observable sign that there is a problem in the body. Chronic pain is generally achy and widespread, and hard to define. Pain is present, but there is no new injury. 

So, if the biology of the two types of pain is different, there must be different ways to approach management.

In acute pain situations, because heat and swelling are in the area of injury, ice and compression are very effective ways to combat those problems. Medication is effective in blocking the pain from the spinal cord to the brain, and the patient will perceive a reduction in pain, while the body does its part in healing.

Chronic pain changes the way in which the brain PERCEIVES information. What might normally be a little bump on the knee, now becomes a painful experience lasting much longer than what would be considered normal. So the body has lost sight of what a normal reaction to pain is. The phenomenon of central sensitization becomes one of the complex issues in chronic pain. Central sensitization is the altered processing of incoming information by the nervous system. What was once normal is no longer normal. It is as confusing as it sounds! Furthermore, things that are normally effective for the tissue damage that occurs with acute injury, no longer become relevant with chronic pain. Ice, compression, medications are not helpful in the same way that they were before.

Environment also plays a role in chronic pain. And what about environment? Consciously or unconsciously, our previous life experience plays a powerful role on the situations we put ourselves into. We have amazing bodies, and our bodies – every scar, every illness, every experience we have, is ultimately a road map to HOW we might react to the events of each day.  These things (previous injuries, surgeries, illnesses) also impact how we CHOOSE to live.  This is a mind-boggling concept, but it is a very important one if you are to fully understand the mechanics of chronic pain.

Having pain has an effect on how we think, feel, and behave.  These models of pain behavior are: biologic (the process actually going on inside our cells), cognitive (thinking), emotional (how we feel about it) and behavioral (how we act because of pain). Interventions need to address all these components of pain including: proper medicines, psychotherapy, exercise, relaxation techniques, and education. Furthermore, the delivery of proper care in order to fully address the scope of the problem is required.


There is no cure for chronic pain, but education, lifestyle changes that incorporate a healthy diet and activity levels, and proper medications can help patients regain control over their lives and their pain. The possibility of a fully engaged, enriching daily life, is certainly attainable. It does take work, and a little discipline, but once you experience freedom from the pain, the shackles will fall off for good. 

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Every Ounce Counts


Didn't you know breast milk is liquid gold?!


We have all heard that “breast is best” when it comes to feeding your newborn baby. But what happens when it doesn’t come as easily as you hoped, are having problems with your baby latching or just simply have questions and you don’t know where to turn?
Here at Women’s Care of Wisconsin we proudly offer lactation and breastfeeding support services. Three of our clinical employees have completed an intense, up-to-date, research-based training course to become Certified Lactation Consultant/Counselors.

Whether you have questions about how milk is produced, correct latch, feeding cues, positioning, milk supply, sore nipples, engorgement, pumping, or how to smoothly transition to returning to work, we are here for you! Breastfeeding is the best choice for both you and your baby, and our goal is to make it a rewarding and successful experience for you.

Whatever the topic, our Certified Lactation Consultant/Counselors can help you with issues over the phone or in person in the office. Even if all you need is a little reassurance that you’re already doing everything correctly, we can provide that too! Meet our breastfeeding specialists below:

Heather Raymond is a Registered Medical Assistant and has been with Women’s Care for 8 years. When asked why breastfeeding is important, Heather says, “Being a mom and being able to provide the best gift ever, a healthy start to a new life. Breast is best—it’s the most rewarding feeling as a women and a mother that no one can ever take away”. For this reason, Heather loves being a Certified Lactation Counselor and looks forward to helping women through their breastfeeding journey!

Kristy Hager, Certified Lactation Consultant, is a Registered Nurse who has worked for Women’s Care for over 5 years. When it comes to being a Lactation Consultant Kristy says, “I have found it to be a very fulfilling experience to help mothers with their lactation needs. It is a very trying time when mom and baby are learning to breastfeed—it can be very emotionally and physically draining. I am happy I can assist during a difficult time and love being able to help make breastfeeding a successful experience.”

Tanya Henry is a Registered Nurse who has been with Women’s Care for over 3 years and enjoys being a Certified Lactation Counselor. “Personally, I wasn’t able to breastfeed my own children. Because of the struggles I faced, I enjoy being able to give other women the advice and support they need to achieve their personal goals for breastfeeding their childrenJ  

For more information and to learn more about how our Certified Lactation Consultant/Counselors can help you, visit our website at www.womenscareofwi.com or call our office at 920.729.7105. 

Photo: Pictured above (from left to right) Kristy Hager, Heather Raymond & Tanya Henry

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Pumps and the Workplace (not the shoes; I only wear flats now!)



Dr. Vandenberg shares a few of her favorite breastfeeding facts and lessons ...


By: Dr. Maria Vandenberg, MD
Obstetrican/Gynecologist


August is National Breastfeeding Awareness Month and there are hundreds of articles and blogs supporting breastfeeding moms circling about.  Here is another. 

First, I, of course, support breastfeeding moms. But, I also support formula feeding moms as well. Breastfeeding is an amazing experience and great for babies when it works, but it saddens me when I see moms feel guilty or disappointed if they use formula. I mostly formula fed my first kiddos and they have turned into wonderful, intelligent, happy 6 year-olds. No guilt here. We all do what is best for each of our children, and need to support and encourage each other.

How many of you are working moms who breastfeed? Well, I’m right there with you. It’s hard, but so worth it if you are successful. Below you will find a list of my favorite pumping and breastfeeding facts and lessons I have learned along the way.

Facts
  • Did you know it is a federal law that companies with over 50 employees are required to provide a location (other than a restroom) and sufficient time for expressing milk for one year after the child’s birth? Check this out: Department of Labor 
  • In Wisconsin, you can breastfeed (it is illegal for anyone to ask you to move or cover up) your child anywhere it is legal for you to be. So, don’t break into a Taco Bell to breastfeed; however, if they are open, you can feed your child. Here is more info: State Breastfeeding Laws 
  • Most health insurances will supply a breast pump for breastfeeding moms!


Lessons
  • You can pump anywhere. The airport at empty terminals (although certainly, a strange man will sit next to you when every other seat is available). Bathroom stalls. The car. Even during oral exams through school/training. Pump through the awkwardness, my friends.
  • Like other articles have pointed out, your pump does talk; hopefully it just has nice things to say.
  • The milk you bring home each night really is liquid gold, and only other moms can understand how it feels to lose, spill, forget that precious milk. In fact, my entire supply of frozen milk was thawed because of a faulty circuit this summer. I was sobbing.
  • Your older children may become very interested in breasts and attempt to breastfeed your newest addition. This is endearing, but can be embarrassing in public.


While being a working mother who breastfeeds certainly has its struggles it is also a very rewarding experience for not only myself, but for my little one as well. Remember ladies: you are not alone when it comes to breastfeeding—the staff here at Women’s Care of Wisconsin is here to help, support and encourage you through your breastfeeding journey! To talk with one of our Lactation Consultants or Counselors, just give us a call at 920.729.7105.

Monday, July 28, 2014

Dry Needling: Myth vs. Truth



Connie Strey discusses the common misconceptions of dry needling...


By: Connie Strey, PT, WCS, BCB-PMD, CMTPT
Physical Therapist


Have you been thinking about trying dry needling but want some questions answered before you schedule an appointment? Maybe you aren’t quite sure what dry needling is, are confused about how it differs from acupuncture or you are simply afraid that it will be painful. Physical Therapist, Connie Strey of PT Center for Women clears up some common misconceptions when it comes to dry needling.

Myth: Dry needling and acupuncture are exactly the same

Truth: Dry needling and acupuncture, while they use the same needle types, are two very different treatments. Dry needling is a therapeutic technique where a trained physical therapist inserts small, sterile, solid filament needles into the skin and muscle directly at a trigger point. The ultimate goal is to generate a “twitch response” which helps release the tension and pain located in the muscles. On the other hand, acupuncture involves the insertion of these thin needles through the skin at strategic points of the body. It is a key component of Traditional Chinese medicine that is believed to adjust and alter the body’s energy flow into healthier patterns.         
   
Myth: Dry needling is extremely painful

Truth: While the local “twitch response” causes a very brief painful response, it lasts less than a second. Most patients say they do not feel the insertion of the needle, but describe the pain, from the muscle spasm, as a little electrical shock or a cramping sensation.

Myth: Dry needling comes with a long list of side effects

Truth: The only side effect patients have said they experience is that their muscles tend to feel sore following the procedure and this is perfectly normal! It is recommended that you stretch and apply ice for 2 days after a dry needling treatment.


Connie has personally found dry needling to be a very effective tool for her patients. She treats patients diagnosed with orthopedic problems, pelvic pain, chronic pain, headaches, etc. who have benefited greatly from this manual therapy technique. If you have questions or concerns that were not discussed, please visit our website at www.ptcenterforwomen.com or call our office at 920.729.2982. We will be more than happy to speak with you! 


Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Meet Our New Midwife



Learn more about the newest addition to our Circle of Care...


By: Kay Weina, CNM, APNP    
Certified Nurse Midwife


My name is Kay Weina. I am a certified nurse midwife (CNM) and I am new to Women’s Care of Wisconsin. I am thrilled to join Becky Kahler, CNM and the whole family of providers here at Women’s Care!

I grew up in Berlin and currently reside in Omro.  I am married to a wonderful husband (who cooks!), and I have 4 adult children along with a beautiful new Granddaughter. I love taking Zumba as well as other exercise classes at the YMCA.  I enjoy the outdoors including walking, gardening, camping or just reading.  

I became a midwife in 2004 after being a labor & delivery nurse, and then a perinatal nurse clinician. I have been in the Obstetrics/Gynecology field for 23 years.

Midwifery care has a “high touch, low tech” approach and we are considered experts in supporting women in normal, healthy childbirth. I believe in building partnerships with women and their families by listening and providing information, guidance, and counseling in a shared decision-making process. We partner with other members of the health care team through collaboration and referral to provide the best possible care.  

According to the American Midwifery Certification Board, there are 13,071 CNMs in the United States. In 2012, 94.9% of CNM-attended births occurred in hospitals, 2.6% occurred in freestanding birth centers and 2.5% in homes. 

Midwifery encompasses a full range of primary health care services for women from adolescence through menopause and beyond. CNMs are licensed, independent health care providers who can prescribe medications in all 50 states. The services midwives offer include primary care, gynecologic and family planning services, preconception care, care during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period.


I am excited to be a part of this Circle of Care—hope to meet you soon!

About Women's Care of Wisconsin: The physicians at Women's Care of Wisconsin are devoted to you and your health. That means having the most advanced techniques, up-to-date educational information and a compassionate, caring staff. Our providers offer a well-rounded approach to your OB/GYN care, one that meets both your physical and emotional needs throughout every phase of your life. We call it our Circle of Care. From adolescence through menopause and beyond, you can depend on us. Meet our providers and learn more about gynecology, pregnancy care, midwifery services, infertility, procedures and surgery, incontinence, osteoporosis, menopause management and more at www.womenscareofwi.com.

Monday, April 28, 2014

Massage Therapy for Women



A new service being offered at PT Center for Women...



By: Amanda Newhouse, LMT
Licensed Massage Therapist & Certified Nurturing the Mother Pregnancy Massage Therapist


My name is Amanda Newhouse and I am excited to announce I will be joining PT Center for Women, an extension of Women’s Care of Wisconsin, as a Licensed Massage Therapist. I have always known that I wanted to become a massage therapist, ever since my high school days; I can recall giving “back massage lines” with my fellow volleyball teammates before our games. However, life had other plans for me first.

Before I could begin my journey of becoming a massage therapist I started off by first becoming a wife and mother to three wonderful boys! After the birth of my second son in February 2006, I was lucky enough to receive a free postpartum massage in the hospital the day after delivery. This was my first professional massage…and I LOVED it! This experience reignited my drive to become a massage therapist.

In July 2011, I made the decision to pursue my dream. I enrolled in the Associates in Applied Science-Massage Therapy program at Globe University in Appleton. After I had my first year under my belt I found out I was pregnant with my third son (still trying for a girlJ)!  I graduated with high honors December of 2013 and passed the board exam a week later to become a Licensed Massage Therapist.

At PT Center for Women I will be offering a variety of massage techniques including swedish, hot stone and deep tissue. Through my continued education I have recently become a certified Nurturing the Mother® prenatal and postpartum massage therapist. Many times I get the question of “do I have to be pregnant to see you?” and the answer is no. I offer my services to women during all stages of life.

Over the past 7 years I have had the honor and privilege to work at Women’s Care of Wisconsin which has ignited my passion for women’s health. I look forward to transitioning my work over to PT Center for Women were I will be able to help women through massage, whether it is before, during or after pregnancy.


I am excited to begin my journey as a Massage Therapist and help women achieve a pain free and more relaxed lifestyle. I hope to meet you soon!

For more information about Amanda's services and to schedule an appointment, click here

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Fast Facts About Subfertility


Reasons you and your partner may be struggling to conceive...


By: Amanda Reed, MD

Obstetrician/Gynecologist


Deciding you are ready to add to your family—whether it is your first baby or maybe baby number two—is a big step for any couple. Then, your well-meaning friends and family tell you to “just relax and it will happen.” Unfortunately, now it has been a year of trying and it still hasn’t happened. It may feel like everyone else around you is getting their positive pregnancy tests, which can be a very devastating and isolating time for any couple.

First, let’s define subfertility: in a woman less than 35 years old, it is defined as failure to conceive after 12 months of regular intercourse. In a woman over 35, it is defined as failure to conceive after 6 months of regular intercourse. 15-20% of couples find out they are pregnant each month after regularly trying to conceive, and 80-85% of couples become pregnant after a year of trying. That leaves about one in five couples headed to their doctor for an evaluation of subfertility.

About 20% of subfertility is due to a problem with ovulation. A woman is likely ovulating if she gets regular periods. Other signs of ovulation are breast tenderness prior to a period, +LH surge, and a temperature spike on basal body temperature charting. If ovulation issues arise, medications can be given to help women ovulate. As we get older, our egg quality and quantity decline—there are blood tests that can determine egg quality and quantity.

Fallopian tubal damage accounts for about 15% of subfertility. Tubal damage can be caused by endometriosis, prior sexually transmitted infections, or pelvic adhesions. The fallopian tubes can be evaluated by hysterosalpingogram (a procedure done in radiology) or FemVue (an ultrasound performed right in our office). Male factor accounts for another 25% of subfertility. A semen analysis should be performed early in the evaluation of a subfertile couple.

Next, endometriosis and cervical factor each account for 6 % of subfertility. Some clues that a woman could have endometriosis are painful periods, pain days prior to a period, and pain with intercourse.

Finally, about 28% of couples are given the diagnosis of unexplained subfertility. This diagnosis is given after a thorough evaluation has been performed, but no cause has been found.


No matter the cause of a couple’s subfertility, there are treatment options that the fertility specialists, Dr. Amanda Reed and Dr. Sree, at Women’s Care of Wisconsin can help with. Sometimes, a couple will get a positive pregnancy test with some education about timing of conception, medications to help a woman ovulate, or intrauterine insemination. Sometimes a couple needs a more specialized treatment plan with a fertility specialist (Reproductive Endocrinologist). No matter what your journey is to conceive a baby, Women’s Care of Wisconsin will be there every step of the way. 

About Women's Care of Wisconsin: The physicians at Women's Care of Wisconsin are devoted to you and your health. That means having the most advanced techniques, up-to-date educational information and a compassionate, caring staff. Our providers offer a well-rounded approach to your OB/GYN care, one that meets both your physical and emotional needs throughout every phase of your life. We call it our Circle of Care. From adolescence through menopause and beyond, you can depend on us. Meet our providers and learn more about gynecology, pregnancy care, midwifery services, infertility, procedures and surgery, incontinence, osteoporosis, menopause management and more at www.womenscareofwi.com.

Monday, March 3, 2014

March is Endometriosis Awareness Month




Don't let Endometriosis affect your quality of life...



By Marley Kercher, MD
Obstetrician/Gynecologist


Endometriosis Awareness Month is a time to help women understand the difference between what is and what is not normal to experience during “that time of the month”. Women are often taught that heavy, long periods, low back pain, migraines and/or fatigue are routine symptoms when it comes to menstrual periods. This is wrong. These are signs you may be suffering from endometriosis.


Endometriosis is a condition affecting women of reproductive age, most commonly between the ages of 25-35. Endometriosis occurs when tissue that normally is confined to the lining of the uterus (the “endometrium”) grows outside of the uterus. The most common locations for endometriosis to occur are in the ovaries, fallopian tubes and the structures around the uterus, such as the bowel and bladder. While the exact cause of endometriosis is unknown, one theory is that during each menstrual flow some tissue gets pushed out through the fallopian tubes and implants in the pelvis. There may also be a genetic component associated with endometriosis, since women with a family history are at higher risk of developing it.

The symptoms of endometriosis vary and some women have no symptoms at all. The most common symptom is pelvic pain, particularly during periods. Women may also have pain during intercourse, with bowel movements or urination. Endometriosis may also cause infertility.

The only way to know 100% if you have endometriosis is to visualize the pelvis and abdominal area with a laparoscope. Typically, women with symptoms of endometriosis will be offered medical treatment first, and then surgery if symptoms don’t improve. In addition to anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen, to treat the pain associated with endometriosis, many women are prescribed hormonal contraceptives to suppress their menstrual cycles. More potent medications, such as Lupron, are sometimes used to induce a temporary menopausal state to suppress endometriosis.

Women who wish to preserve their fertility may seek out surgery that is aimed at removing lesions of endometriosis and addressing scar tissue that may have developed due to long standing endometriosis. Typically, about 80% of women who undergo surgical treatment for endometriosis will experience at least temporary relief of their symptoms, but often times pain recurs. This is because some endometriosis is buried deep within the pelvic tissues not visible during surgery. For some women who have completed childbearing and have tried conservative treatments and continue to have pain, in which case a hysterectomy is the best treatment option.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, call Women’s Care of Wisconsin at 920.729.7105 to schedule an appointment and discuss your questions or concerns with one of our providers today.

About Women's Care of Wisconsin: The physicians at Women's Care of Wisconsin are devoted to you and your health. That means having the most advanced techniques, up-to-date educational information and a compassionate, caring staff. Our providers offer a well-rounded approach to your OB/GYN care, on that meets both your physical and emotional needs throughout every phase of your life. We call it our Circle of Care. From adolescence through menopause and beyond, you can depend on us. Meet our providers and learn more about gynecology, pregnancy care, midwifery services, infertility, procedures and surgery,incontinence, osteoporosis, menopause management and more at www.womenscareofwi.com.

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

February is Prenatal Infection Prevention Month


Preventive measures to help ensure a healthy baby...


By Sreedevi Sreenarasimhaiah, MD
Obstetrician/Gynecologist

The joys of pregnancy are often accompanied by many concerns. For example, you may begin to worry about infections, and soon everything may look like a germ or virus infested place. With the right information available to you, you can enjoy your pregnancy without becoming a nervous wreck. The following information touches upon some of the more common infection precautions you should be aware of during your pregnancy.

Influenza
Flu season runs from Fall through Spring, and during that time your doctor will most likely offer you the flu vaccine. It is highly encouraged unless you have an allergy to the components of the vaccine. Getting the flu in pregnancy places you more at risk for flu related complications, like pneumonia (an infection of the lungs), than those who are not pregnant. If you think you have the flu or you have been exposed to someone with the flu, contact your doctor right away to discuss if you need to start medications that shorten the course of the flu or reduce your risks.

Chicken Pox
If you had this illness in childhood or received the vaccine, you need not worry. If you have not, you are not immune and exposure during pregnancy can place you and your unborn child at risk. This respiratory transmitted illness, characterized by high fever and skin eruptions can be very serious to your health depending on which trimester of your pregnancy chicken pox is contracted. Contracting chicken pox during your first trimester may result in problems with the fetus’s development before birth. While contracting chicken pox in the third trimester may result in spreading of the illness to the fetus/newborn as well as pneumonia in the mother and requiring hospitalization. If you are unsure if you are immune to chicken pox, your doctor can do a simple blood test to determine this. Teachers, daycare workers and those with small children are at greatest risk for exposure to chicken pox.

Listeria
Listeria is a food borne illness and can contribute to amniotic or placental infection. This infection has been associated with spontaneous abortions and neonatal sepsis. Avoiding unpasteurized dairy products such as raw milk or certain cheeses is important. Deli meats and hot dogs unless properly prepared, heated or irradiated, can also pose a risk.

Parvovirus
This self-limited illness is often seen in children, but can be seen in adults. It is classically described as “slapped cheek” appearance. Red cheeks and a high fever with joint and muscle aches are characteristic. Like chicken pox, you may already be immune to this from previous exposure; a simple blood test by your doctor will determine this. If a person is exposed to or gets this infection during pregnancy, your doctor will need to discuss monitoring the unborn baby for signs of hydrops (a swelling of the tissues due to severe anemia and organ dysfunction) in the baby. Although this is a risk of parvovirus, it does not occur in the majority of cases. It is important to report if you have another child at home who might be diagnosed with this.

Other infection
  • Urinary tract infections can be very common in pregnancy and your doctor will typically screen you for this on your first visit.  Urine frequency is a normal symptom of pregnancy, but burning and pain are not. Be sure to discuss these symptoms right away, should they occur. 
  • The common cold and sinus infections may occur as well, these do not pose a risk to your baby, but over the counter medications approved by your doctor may help with symptom management as well as in some cases, antibiotics may be necessary. 
  • Toxoplasmosis is the infection that we try to avoid by advising against cleaning cat’s litter boxes during pregnancy.
  • The tetanus immunization combined with pertussis (for whooping cough) is now routinely offered during pregnancy as well. 

Remember: common sense, good hand washing, avoiding sick contacts and reporting anything unusual are going to get you far. The providers at Women’s Care of Wisconsin would love the privilege to take care of you and answer any questions you might have about infection precautions during this stage of your life. Enjoy your pregnancy!

About Women's Care of Wisconsin: The physicians at Women's Care of Wisconsin are devoted to you and your health. That means having the most advanced techniques, up-to-date educational information and a compassionate, caring staff. Our providers offer a well-rounded approach to your OB/GYN care, on that meets both your physical and emotional needs throughout every phase of your life. We call it our Circle of Care. From adolescence through menopause and beyond, you can depend on us. Meet our providers and learn more about gynecology, pregnancy care, midwifery services, infertility, procedures and surgery,incontinence, osteoporosis, menopause management and more at www.womenscareofwi.com


Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Breastfeeding 101: Myths vs. Facts



Have a successful breastfeeding journey with the help of our Certified Lactation Counselors...

Chances are you have heard at least one breastfeeding myth. Unfortunately, these myths can make expecting mothers question their ability to successfully breastfeed. When a mother is armed with accurate knowledge, support and reasonable expectations about breastfeeding, she is more likely to have confidence in her breastfeeding abilities and enjoy her breastfeeding journey with her baby. Some of the most common breastfeeding myths are explained below…





Myth:  Breast size maters…the bigger they are, the more milk they will produce.
  • Fact:  Size does NOT matter for producing adequate milk supply. Supply is based on demand, so if you are feeding your baby on cue, your body will react by producing enough for your baby.

Myth:  If I eat any junk food, spicy food, chocolate, etc., my baby will be fussy.
  • Fact:  Babies are exposed to all the food styles you ate while you were pregnant through the amniotic fluid, so there is no need to change your diet after giving birth. This is one way to teach your baby the food of your culture. Studies have actually shown that babies will feed longer at the breast after mom has eaten garlic!

Myth:  If I’ve had breast implants, a reduction, or other breast surgery, I can’t breastfeed.
  • Fact:  Having a breast surgery does not necessarily mean you can’t breastfeed. Depending on the type of surgery and where incisions were made, the ducts in the breast may have been affected…but, this should not stop you from even attempting to breastfeed. Your baby will likely need to be monitored closely to ensure adequate growth.

Myth:  If I drink any alcohol at all, I need to “pump and dump”.
  • Fact:  Alcohol does pass through breast milk, and babies often do not like the taste. Alcohol does not stay “trapped” in breast milk, it passes back and forth as your alcohol level changes, so there is no need to “pump and dump”. Daily alcohol intake should be no more than 0.5g/kg of your weight. So a woman that weights 60kg (132 lbs.), this would be 2-2.5oz of liquor, 8oz of wine or 2 cans of beer. Drinking alcohol does NOT increase your milk supply.

MORE FACTS ABOUT BREASTFEEDING
  • Compared with breastfed babies, formula fed babies are at greater risk for:
    • Acute ear infections
    • Intestinal issues
    • Lower respiratory tract infections
    • Atopic dermatitis
    • Asthma
    • Obesity
    • Type 1 and 2 diabetes 

  • Women who chose to breastfeed are at less risk for:
    • Breast caner
    • Ovarian cancer
    • Type 2 diabetes
    • Heart attack
    • Postpartum depression

Women’s Care of Wisconsin has four Certified Lactation Counselors—all whom are please to support mothers during their pregnancy and after the birth of their child. Breastfeeding can be one of the most natural and intimate of all human interactions…but please remember, just because it’s natural does not mean it’s easy—especially in those first few weeks with your newborn. Breastfeeding takes knowledge, patients and lots of practice.

Women’s Care offers physical appointments as well as phone conversations about breastfeeding concerns. Our lactation counselors are here to support you and any problems that may arise. If your baby is having a hard time latching or even if you just need reassurance, no issue is too small. Babies are all individual and sometimes it takes a little longer for you and your baby to get comfortable with breastfeeding. To discuss your breastfeeding questions or concerns with one of our counselors, please call our office at 920.729.7105. 

Photo: Certified Lactation Counselors at Women's Care of Wisconsin. From left to right-- Stephanie, Tanya, Heather and Kristy.

About Women’s Care of Wisconsin: The physicians at Women’s Care of Wisconsin are devoted to you and your health. That means having the most advanced techniques, up-to-date educational information and a compassionate, caring staff. Our providers offer a well-rounded approach to your OB/GYN care, one that meets both your physical and emotional needs throughout every phase of your life. We call it our Circle of Care. From adolescence through menopause and beyond, you can depend on us. Meet our providers and learn more about gynecology, pregnancy care, midwifery services, infertility, procedures and surgery, incontinence, osteoporosis, menopause management and more at www.womenscareofwi.com.